Be More Productive By NOT Doing These Things

Wed Sep 7, 2016

Jessica Helinski

Man Office ComputerWhile there may be no magic formula for being productive, there are certain dos and don’ts that can impact how much, and how efficiently, you get things done. Lolly Daskal, in an article for Inc., shares things that one should NOT do in order to maximize productivity, noting that productive people’s “good habits for super-productivity include being disciplined about the things they refuse to do.” Take a look at a few of her suggested don’ts below:

  • Refuse to pursue perfection. No one is perfect. Once you understand and accept that, you have the power to drive productivity. Accepting the very real possibility of snafus, delays, and uncertain outcomes will help you actually move past trying to control everything and get things done.
  • Refuse to be distracted. There are so many distractions nowadays, and it’s up to you to turn a blind eye and focus on your tasks.
  • Refuse to be dragged down by past failures. Don’t focus on your failures, learn from them and move on. Take what you can from the experience and move forward, or otherwise, the past will keep holding you back from achieving.
  • Refuse self-limiting beliefs. Negative self-talk can only bring negative results. “Challenge your self-limiting beliefs at every turn, because most of them are not true at all, and none of them are helpful,” Daskal advises. “It’s the things we whisper to ourselves that are the most powerful.”

Boosting productivity is more than just working longer hours or writing out daily schedules. As Danskal points out, refusal of certain behaviors or thoughts can have a big impact on your productivity, clearing the path for you to move forward and reach your goals.

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About Jessica Helinski

Jessica is a senior research analyst for SalesFuel focusing on the specialties of local account category research and audience trends. She reports on sales and presentation tips for Media Sales Today. Jessica is a graduate of Ohio University.

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